A simple explanation for why it’s important to wear a mask to stop the spread of a virus

So intuitively, when we sneeze we put our hand in front of our face right? And CDC and WHO says that instead it is better to sneeze into our elbow?

So if we could somehow take our elbow and always hold it in front of our face, according to CDC and WHO it would be a good thing?

So if we take some barrier that is not our elbow and put it always in front of our face … that’s a mask!

Any mask is better than no mask. It’s obvious! Please always cover your face with a barrier when in public. When in doubt, remember this cat 🐱

Here’s a more detailed and comprehensive explanation for why masks work. And why many of us were told they don’t work.

2 thoughts on “A simple explanation for why it’s important to wear a mask to stop the spread of a virus

  1. “Any mask is better than no mask. It’s obvious! Please always cover your face with a barrier when in public. When in doubt, remember this cat.”

    Dude, you’re making the world a worse place in which to live.

    What you showed is insanely juvenile and wrong. Insanely so. Here’s some info to help you ditch your slave muzzle:

    Masks do not work because they cannot work: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanres/article/PIIS2213-2600(20)30323-4/fulltext

    Seriously, stop being a compliant sheep. The ‘Rona is the flu, nothing more. Live your life. Enjoy.

    And take off the slave muzzle. Unless you’re really Massuh’s Slave Boy.

    1. Thanks for sharing. Wondering if you read the whole paper you just shared? There’s a part there which shows we may be talking past each other.

      1. Masks don’t protect the wearer from being infected – TRUE and agreed

      2. Masks don’t protect others from being infected by the wearer – FALSE

      The recommendation to wear a mask is to protect others in case you might be infected. You are right that wearing a mask yourself doesn’t protect you from others who might be infected. Which is why people who are at a low risk of being infected (e.g. people who are vaccinated) are not requested to wear a mask.

      [in the article you shared, please scroll to this section]
      Masks to prevent transmission from the wearer

      Although surgical masks offer little protection from inhaled agents, they have a role in protecting health-care workers when worn by patients. Placing surgical masks on patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis decreased transmission to guinea pigs by 56%,138 and masking of patients with cystic fibrosis reduced P aeruginosa air contamination by 8%.139 Surgical masks reduced the quantity of influenza viral RNA by 2·8 times in small particles and by 25 times in large ones.45 More recently, surgical masks effectively reduced large droplets (>5 μm) of seasonal coronaviruses from three of ten patients to 0 of 11 (p=0·09) and small aerosols (<5 μm) from four of ten patients to 0 of 11 (p=0·04).47 Similarly, surgical masks reduced droplets of influenza from six of 23 to one of 27 (p=0·04). However, the reduction in influenza small aerosols (<5 μm) was not significant. There is mounting evidence suggesting that the wearing of masks can reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in community and health-care settings.140

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