An example of what HDR images capture

Modern devices can display a significantly wider dynamic range than what was possible a few years ago. What that means is that there can be a larger difference between the darkest and brightest parts of an image, closer to what the human eye can perceive.

Above is a very quick example of what that looks like. This is a picture we took in the Death Valley National Park last weekend.

1) this is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) image that has enough detail in the mountains in the background (highlights) as well as on the animal in the foreground (shadows).

2) this shows the Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) version of the photo where we try to retain the same level of details in the highlights but then we lose the details in the shadows

3) this shows the SDR version of the photo where we try to retain the same level of details in the shadows but then we lose the details in the highlights.

If you view this on a screen that can’t do HDR you wont perceive much difference between the images.

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